Social Issues

What You Didn’t Know about Romeo Santos

romeo santos

Anthony “Romeo” Santos, or just Romeo Santos to his fans, may be considered the modern “King of Bachata”, but it wasn’t that long ago that the half Dominican, half Puerto Rican heartthrob was simply a shy kid writing poetry at home to try to woo a girl that use to be mean to him.

“She wasn’t the nicest girl. I expressed myself by writing poems and lyrics (to her but) I kind of thank her now for being so mean to me,” said Santos.

Growing up in the Bronx, Santos was exposed to hip-hop, R&B and Latin music. The introverted singer continued to find his voice after joining his church choir and in 1994 he decided to form a group with his cousin Henry Santos and friends Lenny and Max Santos, in which he was the lead singer.

The group would later go on to be called Aventura and be the first bachata group to hail from the U. S. instead of the Dominican Republic. Despite the group’s rise from the streets of the Bronx, to its first cover on a magazine, Dominican Times/Latin Trends, and to stadiums around the world, Aventura received a lot of initial backlash from older traditional bachata listeners and musicians. By fusing bachata with R&B, hip-hop, rock and reggaeton, bachata purist didn’t acknowledge the group as making bachata music.

In spite of the criticism, Aventura went on to achieve international success with songs like “Obsesion”, which is covered in multiple languages throughout Europe, and the album which it’s included, “We Broke the Rules”, topped the pop charts in the United States and broke sales records for a bachata album.

In 2012, the once timid Santos decided to go out on his own with his debut solo album, “Formula Vol. 1.” Vol. 1 was the best selling Latin album of that year, was critically acclaimed and went on to be certified Triple Platinum. The bachata tracks on the album were written, produced and arranged by Santos. The superstar producer, Rico Love,  worked on the English songs. Vol. 1 has five consecutive chart topping songs on Billboard’s Hot Latin Songs, “You,” “Promise,” “La Diabla,” “Mi Santa,” and “Rival.”

“I want to touch people’s lives with my music and my lyrics,” said Santos.

Santos’ Hollywood debut was in the blockbuster hit movie, “Furious 7” and his second film will be in 2016’s film adaptation of the video game “Angry Birds.” Santos’ second solo album, “Formula Vol. 2”, which he is on tour for now, became the best selling Latin album of 2014. It features songs like, “No Tiene La Culpa,” about a gay youth’s struggle with his sexuality.

“The message is that we shouldn’t worry about anyone’s sexual preferences, nor color, race, language, or anything, because we are all equal… this is not a gay record, this is a reality song,” said Santos, a strong supporter of the LGBTQ community.

Fun Facts

  • He is the first Latino to headline a concert at Yankee Stadium
  • He helped usher Drake and Nicki Minaj into bachata music
  • His music is in heavy rotation on jukeboxes, second only to the Rolling Stones
  • He sang in English and Spanish when he was in his church choir
  • He has won all 28 American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers’ awards

By Naeisha Rose

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Official Report Shows Immigrants commit less crime than US-born citizens

By Rafael Bernal

Immigrants commit crimes and are incarcerated at a much lower rate than U.S. citizens, according to two separate studies released this week.

A study by The Sentencing Project, a criminal justice research and advocacy group, found that “foreign-born residents of the United States commit crime less often than native-born citizens.”

Another study, by the libertarian Cato Institute, compares incarceration rates by migratory status, ethnicity and gender.

“All immigrants are less likely to be incarcerated than natives relative to their shares of the population,” the Cato study reads.

On the campaign trail and as president, Donald Trump has portrayed illegal immigration as a dual risk: an economic threat and a source of increased crime. Under President Trump’s 2018 budget request, the Department of Homeland Security’s (DHS) budget would grow by $3 billion to fund his proposed border wall and executive orders on immigration.

When he launched his presidential bid, Trump said that illegal immigrants “are bringing crime.” And in speeches, he frequently mentions individuals whose loved ones have been killed by illegal immigrants.

“It’s all enforcement-only, following the rhetoric of Trump that he used in the campaign and continues to use, making immigrants at fault for everything, from crime to the economy,” said Rep. Raúl Grijalva (D-Ariz.).

But the two studies don’t point to immigrants posing more of a threat of crime than citizens born in the U.S.

Among people aged 18-54, 1.53 percent of natives are incarcerated, as are 0.85 percent of undocumented immigrants and 0.47 percent of documented immigrants, according to the Cato study of comparative incarceration rates.

The Cato study found that there are about 2 million U.S-born citizens, 123,000 undocumented immigrants and 64,000 documented foreign citizens in U.S. jails.

If natural-born citizens were incarcerated at the same rate as undocumented immigrants, “about 893,000 fewer natives would be incarcerated,” read the study. Similarly, if native citizens were incarcerated at the same rate as documented immigrants, 1.4 million fewer would be in prison.

The Sentencing Project study even goes so far as to suggest that increased immigration “may have contributed to the historic drop in crime rates” since 1990.

While the study is “not definitive in proving causation,” it links crime trends — 730 violent crimes per 100,000 citizens in 1990 compared to 362 per 100,000 in 2014 — and immigration trends in the same period. According to the study, there were 3.5 million undocumented immigrants in the country in 1990, and 11.1 million in 2014.

Democrats say it’s a well-known fact that immigrants are less likely to commit crimes, but they say Trump is using fear of immigrants for political gain among his voter base.

“There’s always the horrible, fallacious view that you have to go after immigrants and then you point out a few immigrants that have committed horrible crimes,” said Rep. Juan Vargas (D-Calif.).

“You could do the same with mothers. I remember quite well a mother taking her children and driving them into a lake, and they all drowned. You wouldn’t make the argument then that mothers are bad and we have to go after mothers because mothers are criminal,” he added.

Grijalva said the tactic would ultimately backfire on Republicans.

“The weakest of people in this country are the ones being made the scapegoats for everything, and unfortunately, facts don’t matter, logic doesn’t matter,” said Grijalva.

“It’s a rush to deal with a campaign issue that I think Republicans in general and the Trump administration specifically feel that an anti-immigrant strategy is going to be something that will serve them well in the next round of elections. I don’t think so, I think it’s going to catch up with them,” he said.

But for Rep. Mario Diaz-Balart (R-Fla.), the issue isn’t whether the Trump administration enforces existing laws based on statistical information, but whether those laws are adequate. He criticized both Trump and former President Obama for their immigration priorities.

“This president is emphasizing border security — the last president deported more people than anybody in history. Both of those approaches, I think, don’t deal with a big part of what is broken, which is a legal system that is just dysfunctional,” Diaz-Balart said.

Diaz-Balart added that the border is “porous” and that Trump is fulfilling his campaign promises by focusing on border security.

But Democrats have a sense of urgency in reversing Trump’s initial actions on immigration, both because they believe that immigrants are less prone to crime, and because they disagree with Trump’s budget proposal.

“I live in San Diego. A high number of immigrants live there, both documented and undocumented, and that’s one of the reasons why it’s such a safe area. The crime rate among immigrants is much lower than it is among the general population. So spending all this money to go after immigrants, a safer population, really makes no sense at all,” said Vargas.

Source: The Hill 

Bolivia’s Cocaine Bar

As drug abuse is rising at an alarming rate, some places are lifting a ban on marijuana, places like Amsterdam are known for featuring the finest hashish on actual menus. Several states have recently legalized marijuana in the US, but in South America, Bolivia has taken a steep and bold jump with cocaine bars which let its customers order “a gram of coke” with a your favorite drink.

The bar known as Route 36 is also touted as the first cocaine bar in the world and although it is situated in La Paz, it keeps on changing the location in order to avoid the authorities.

lapaz

The existence of such a bar in Bolivia may come as no surprise if you know that the coca leaf is cultivated locally in the country and is a traditionally popular product in the region.

“Since they are an after-hours club and serve cocaine the neighbors tend to complain pretty fast. So they move all the time. Maybe if they are lucky they last three months in the same place, but often it is just two weeks. Route 36 is a movable feast,” says a Bolivian newspaper editor who asked not to be named. “One day it is in one zone and then it pops up in another area. Certainly it is the most famous among the backpacker crowd but there are several other places that are offering cocaine as well. Because Route 36 changes addresses so much there is a lot of confusion about how many cocaine bars are out there.”This new trend of ‘cocaine tourism’ can be put down to a combination of Bolivia’s notoriously corrupt public officials, the chaotic “anything goes” attitude of La Paz.

As surreal as it may sound, the bar serves a drug known to be one of the most destructive and addictive substances which has had drastic consequences on many people across the globe, while drug wars have resulted in the death of countless people, others just keep partying on…

 

 

A Message from the NYPD to New York’s Immigrant Community

 

A Message from the NYPD to New York’s Immigrant Community

The NYPD is committed to maintaining a welcoming environment for immigrant communities while also maintaining public safety for all. With this backdrop, the NYPD believes it is important to reiterate our immigration related policies.

The NYPD accepts the city’s IDNYC as a valid and recognized form of government-issued identification including for the issuance of summonses and Desk Appearance Tickets.

The NYPD does not inquire about the immigration status of crime victims, witnesses, or others who call or approach the police seeking assistance.

The NYPD does not conduct civil immigration enforcement. Specifically, this department does not enforce administrative warrants issued by Immigration and Custom Enforcement agents or federal immigration judges solely in connection with civil immigration violations.

It is our city’s resolve to remain a safe and welcoming place for all immigrants.

THE NYPD IS HERE FOR YOU.

 

Ralphy Dominguez goes from the South Bronx-to-Prison-to-an-Entrepreneur

His name is Ralphy Dominguez, he once ran one of the largest drug rings in New England, making over a million dollars a year. After spending close to five years in prison, he’s reinvented himself as an entrepreneur in  New York City with his leather goods brand Pen & Pistol a product line of all leather accessories.

What started as a leather craft course when Dominguez was behind bars flourished into a promising startup. In both worlds, he says he found something therapeutic and rewarding in working with his hands. After prison, Dominguez, originally from the South Bronx, found his way to Refoundry, a nonprofit organization in Brooklyn that coaches ex-cons to start their own ventures by training them to turn discarded materials into beautifully designed products.

 

“Refoundry lent itself to the first major problem that you face coming home, which is trying to find a decent paying job and Refoundry offered that and then it offered me a way to dream bigger, to start my own business,”

Dominguez’s company continues to use discarded materials, including leather from old sofas and handbags, as well as scrap leather from manufacturers that would otherwise be tossed out. He uses the materials to craft hand-stitched wallets and business card holders, which retail for between $30 and $75 on Pen & Pistol’s website

 

Dominguez credits the artisan skills and entrepreneurship know-how he learned behind bars and at Refoundry with helping him discover a new and rewarding life outside of prison.

“I was a hothead, I was a young gun, I was troublesome,” he said, “and going through the experience of prison, I really had the opportunity to redraft and re-pen my life.”

The entrepreneurial story he’s writing is one of revival through persistence. Pen & Pistol has started to catch hold, as a growing number of consumers are inspired by his story of reinvention and his brand’s beautiful designs. Dominguez started selling at flea markets throughout New York City, such as the Brooklyn Flea, Artists & Fleas and others. He’s since secured shelf space at different outlets, namely Lazaro SoHo, a high-end boutique in Manhattan.

Today, the Pen & Pistol founder comes across as an unassuming young man with a story to tell.

He appears thoughtful and determined, a far cry from the tumultuous youth he describes from his former life. Dominguez uses his past experiences to shape his success and is motivated to pay it forward. He helps others with a criminal record—including Pen & Pistol President Walter Escobar—to take back control of their lives through his leather craft business.

Dominguez says that ex-cons are well positioned to become successful entrepreneurs.

“That hustle was there, that spirit, that thirst for entrepreneurship is there,” Dominguez said. “And I think coming from a place where we had nothing and we can only gain—this is really what motivates people coming home from prison.”

I say on Dominican Independence Day; New York’s Rich Diversity is “Kick Ass”

To many Dominican Americans Independence celebration comes twice a year, July 4th and February 27th

Independence is about liberty and the struggle of the fight to get that liberty, which we all enjoy today. Independence by default is a word with deep meaning, it’s not just about celebrating the victory of becoming independent with parties, fireworks, barbecues or “diablos cojuelos”.  It’s about not forgetting the fight of those that came before us and gave up their life, so that we in turn can enjoy the freedoms we all have today. That’s independence!

New York’s Vibrant Dominican Community currently represents the largest Hispanic group in the city (774,473) according to  Census data analysis by CUNY’s Center for Latin American, Caribbean & Latino Studies. However, that number is being debated to be well over one Million by many, but numbers aside, one thing that is visual and accountable, and that is the very much felt presence of Dominicans in New York. A presence that one can see, feel and hear throughout the city and even in parts of Jersey, PA, Connecticut, Massachusetts and Rhode Island.

Just take a walk around most local neighborhoods within Brooklyn, Queens, Manhattan and the Bronx at the many the barbershops and beauty salons when you get your next hair cut or hairdo and you will most likely experience this culture, or when you take your car to the local mechanic or go pick up milk at the to the corner bodega or the one next to it.

Hungry? hop on in to your favorite Dominican restaurant ( there are plenty) when you crave that “arros blanco con habichuela, pollo y maduros”.

Need a cab and don’t have uber? No problem call your local taxi base and there’s a 80% probability that the driver will most likely be on his cell phone or listening to “Anthony Santos”.

Dominicans currently represent the ethnic group with the largest percentage of small business ownership in New York, according to published articles in NY Times, New York daily News and the NY post. Another interesting fact is on the educational front, although there are really no concrete studies that determine the number of College students or graduates of Dominican decent, we did find a 2004 study by Ramona Hernandez, Ph.D. director of Dominican Studies Institute at CUNY and Anthony Stevens-Acevedo, which reports that Dominican students enrolled in colleges and universities has been rising steadily. The study, indicates that in 2000 Dominican students made up 26.4% of the Hispanic student body enrolled in colleges and universities in New York City.

US politics are also an area of interest to many Dominicans. Just this year alone history was made when Adriano Espaillat became the first Dominican American elected into the US congress and Thomas Perez became the first Latino ever to be elected as the leader of the national democratic party, Thomas a Dominican American who served as President Obama’s labor secretary is now the chairman of the DNC, Democratic National Committee. This was just confirmed a few days ago.

The Dominican community has contributed greatly to the fabric that makes New York the greatest city in the world and will continue to do so together with other cultures. So today we celebrate our Dominican heritage in unity with all, because it’s not about being less than or better than. It’s about respecting others and their cultures, while embracing our own, it’s this rich cultural diversity that makes New York a “ Kick Ass” city and the capital of the world.

As a Dominican American, I take pride in being American and in my Dominican roots. I was born in Santo Domingo, raised in Brooklyn and became an American Citizen by choice many years ago. I acknowledge the blessing of living in a country where I can cherish and respect both cultures, but even more important, I am grateful that at the end of the day, we are all one nation under God, as truly we are all brothers and sisters beneath the sun. I also acknowledge that as humans and as a Nation we are not perfect and that’s ok, because that gives us even more reason to strive to thrive. As an entrepreneur with an affinity towards forward thinking people and forward moving causes, I want to say, on this day celebrating Dominican Independence; God Bless America!

Meaning of “Dominican”
The word “Dominican” has a meaning beyond the one of being born in the Dominican Republic… it actually means “God’s sons.” According to our history, this name is given to us after a group of religious educators, who arrived on the island of “La Hispañola” when we were still a Spanish colony.

Colors of the Dominican flag
Our Dominican flag represents our Independence.. the first Dominican flag was designed and created by María Trinidad Sánchez, Sánchez’s aunt, where she included blue, representing God’s blessings over our nation, red representing our liberators’ blood and the white cross symbolizing our Independence as an inheritance from those who fought for our freedom.

 

Fight for freedom! A short history of the Dominican Republic
After Christopher Columbus arrived in 1492, a point when many cultures clashed during the Spanish colonization of “La Hispañola” island, as he called it, the Dominican Republic then became a battle zone where French, Spanish and Haitian troops fought for our land.

Soon after,  Spain suddenly became uninterested and left the Dominican Republic – after gold was found in México and other areas in America, but the land was soon invaded by French troops and affected by the Haitian Revolution; events which revolutionized the course of our history.  After the reconciliation between slaves and French men, the Spanish troops were defeated by forces led by General Toussaint Louverture, and it was in 1795 when France took over the island, with the abolition of slavery proclaimed by Louverture in Santo Domingo.

When the French forces returned to France after several years, the Haitians then invaded the towns of Santiago and Moca causing not only many deaths, but quite a dislike from residents from the Eastern part of the island, since they were forced to give up their language, culture and beliefs, adapt and become French speaking country.

Of course, the situation wouldn’t last forever… in 1838 a man named Juan Pablo Duarte who was born in Santo Domingo and founded a secret society named “La Trinitaria” and along with his good friends Matías Ramón Mella and Francisco del Rosario Sánchez, secretly planned on putting an end to Haitian repression. How?

In 1843 they joined a Haitian movement to defeat Boyer (the French leader), after which they were exiled and imprisoned in Puerto Príncipe by the new Haitian President, Charles Riviere-Hérard, since he feared their revolutionary ideas of independence. However after an attack produced by Haitians, Charles definitely needed the help of “La Trinitaria” and they were then released.

Meanwhile, Buenaventura Báez, who was a wood exporter and also Deputy at the Haitian’s National Assembly, was negotiating with France a way of establishing French forces in order to protect the Haitian Government from rebels – and since Duarte, Mella and Sánchez knew about this event, on the 27th of February 1844 they immediately declared their Independence from Haiti! You may ask how?…

The canon shot by Matías Ramón Mella on the night of the 27th of February 1844 at the “Puerta del Conde” (now famous for this event) was the official declaration of the Dominican war of Independence, which was supported by Pedro Santana (who became the Dominican Republic’s first President) along with hundreds of his workers and residents from Santo Domingo. To cries of “Dios, Patria y Libertad” (God, Homeland and Freedom), the Dominican flag was raised for the first time at the “Puerta del Conde” and the Haitian forces were confronted – causing the, to retreat and meaning that the Dominicans were finally free!!

Although Haiti tried to invade on several other occasions, the Dominican Republic maintained its Independence for 17 more years, thanks to Pedro Santana’s bright idea of handing the power back to Spain – but that’s a different story! We will be publishing more details about it soon!

 

Code2040 “The Future of Tech”, Lin-Manuel Miranda & the Chance to see Hamilton

A NOTE FROM LIN-MANUEL MIRANDA

Hi everyone!

Did you miss me?! Well I’m back on Prizeo and this time I’m here with my parents. We’re giving you a chance to win a trip for two to opening night of Hamilton in San Francisco on March 23rd. Since I’m in London, I can’t make it. But you’ll be going with my mom and dad—Luz and Luis! They’re the best and they’re going to make sure you have an incredible time.

It is more important than ever that for-profit and civil society are stepping up to build inclusive, safe spaces where minorities can work and thrive. By donating as little as $10 to be entered to win, your donations will also help support Code2040 and the Latino Community Foundation, two amazing organizations that are helping build the leaders of the future. Please check out their sites to learn more about the incredible work they’re doing.

Sweepstakes Page

And if you donate more, you’ll be getting extra entries (every $10 is 100 entries), helping the work being done by Code2040 and LCF even more, and you’ll get rewards! Check ’em out—new t-shirts, signed items, and our brand spankin’ new tank top.

Whoever wins, we’ll fly you and a guest to San Francisco for opening night and we’ll put you up in a hotel. Plus you’ll be going to the show as my parents’ guests! I can’t wait to see who wins and hear how it goes!

I am thrilled that we’re supporting the work of Code2040 and LCF—and that you get the chance to experience the San Francisco Hamilton opening night! Thank you again for continuing to team up with me and supporting the work of so many incredible causes.

Siempre,
Lin-Manuel

Falling in Love with failure

On this Valentine’s Day, let’s forget about the roses, just for a minute. Let’s take a step back from the champagne and put down the chocolates. Amid all this talk about love and relationships, I have a proposition to make: I think it’s about time we settle down and seriously start to court FAILURE.

failure-is-not-falling-down-but-refusing-to-get-up-36

I know what you’re thinking. On the surface, failure might not be the most eye-catching gem in the jewelry shop. Whether it appears in the form of missing deadlines, flubbing proposal requirements, or running a business model into the ground, failing at something—especially if it’s something that truly matters to you—is the toughest break to take. Failure is not fun to be around, it doesn’t have a lot of flexibility, and it’s incredibly unforgiving. It’s a cruel mistress in its own right, a necessary evil.

Yet failure is something that I deeply respect and hold dear. It’s an experience that I embrace, and more importantly, it’s something that I celebrate at athenahealth. Yes, I celebrate failure—and no, I’m not crazy. At athenahealth, our community of teachers and learners is founded upon the necessary give and take of knowledge, and the belief that learning can only happen in an environment where failure can, and even regularly should happen. It doesn’t take a lot of ambition to coast along the upper echelons, or to year after year hit every vanilla goal you set for yourself. Climbing your way from failing to achieving, on the other hand, requires impressive tenacity, critical thought, and a hell of a learning curve.

Failure, then, is a necessary framework for success. Think of it this way: With every choice that ends up being wrong, you simply find one more way to narrow down what’s right. If you completely wreck a huge project at work, then congratulations! As long as you learned something along the way and take that knowledge with you when you next step up to the plate, then count that failure as a success. Or, more impressively, embrace your missed swing, brush yourself off, and pivot your experience into a whole new direction. Learning from failure is egregiously time-consuming and self-reflective, but incredibly valuable in the journey to success.

 

Henry Ford once said, “Failure is simply the opportunity to begin again, this time more intelligently.” Cull what isn’t working; strengthen what is. This is true of everything, from creating a business from scratch, to taking a leadership role on your team, to achieving your New Year’s goals. Whether or not we like to accept it, failing is as inevitable as breathing, so when something goes amiss, it’s important that you’ve been paying attention along the way. Knowing what doesn’t work is as valuable as knowing what does: Once you can learn from your mistakes and step back up to the plate with the same enthusiasm that you had before, you are guaranteed to succeed, thrive, and lead.

We spend most of our time recognizing and applauding success, without acknowledging the failures and struggles that stand beside it, hand in hand. So on this day of love and admiration, I want to wish failure a happy—and long overdue—Valentine’s Day. It too often gets the short end of the stick, always in the periphery, an unspoken annoyance. Today, let’s fall in love with failure and all of the thorny and meaningful moments that it creates on the road to success. After all, success born from failure is the sweetest success there is.

How would you define your relationship with failure?

Originally published By: Jonathan Bush CEO and Co-founder at athenahealth

 

→Side notes

“Failure should be our teacher, not our undertaker. Failure is delay, not defeat. It is a temporary detour, not a dead end. Failure is something we can avoid only by saying nothing, doing nothing, and being nothing.” — Denis Waitley

 

People who are successful in life always learn from their mistakes and so-called failures. Michael Korda, editor in chief at Simon Schuster, says, “Never walk away from failure. On the contrary, study it carefully and imaginatively for its hidden assets.” And Bill Gates believes that, “It’s fine to celebrate success but it is more important to heed the lessons of failure.”

 

Actor Mickey Rooney believed that, “You always pass failure on your way to success.” Salespeople often talk about “sales ratios,” or the number of rejections they’ll probably get before they make a sale. For example, it may typically take 30 calls to land one new client appointment. Keeping this in mind, good salespeople don’t look at rejections as “failure” but just one step closer to the win.

Massive Protest by Latinos, non-Latinos & Small Businesses In Support of “A Day without Immigrants”

Today as part of “A Day without Immigrants” protest, thousands of local businesses are closed today, and many employees are staying home and skipping work as well.

“It’s going to hurt a lot of businesses and especially the economy,” said one Ramon De La Cruz a small business owner in Brooklyn.  “But it’s for a good cause.”

fulton

De La Cruz is willingly giving up a day’s profits to participate in “Un Dia Sin Immigrantes,” or “A Day Without Immigrants.”

The movement, Ramon said, is meant to show the entire country how large and involved the Hispanic population is.

There is even a hashtag, which is #protestthursday

Bodegas, restaurants, Laundromats, doctors, lawyers —  every single business is hurting with this economy, but we still have to stand for something” He said. “my wish, that by doing this they see that we are important to, New York and the whole country.

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The movement doesn’t only call for businesses to close down on the Feb.16, it also calls for all immigrants to stay home, to not spend money online or in stores, to close their businesses and to not attend school or classes.

Rallies are planned has been planned throughout the country, a unified voice is growing on “Un Dia Sin Immigrantes.”

Organizers have called for a peaceful protest.  They’re asking attendees to wear white shirts to show a peaceful movement and to wear or bring U.S. flags.

These are the Sates (Cities) that in which there will be active protesting in business closed and or rallies: New York, Pennsylvania, Washington, DC, Maryland, Virginia, Texas, New Mexico, Minnesota, Massachusetts, Kentucky, Illinois, Arizona, California and Colorado,

To many of the participants,  the most important thing is to show their community and families that they aren’t alone.

“We just want to let them know that we are with them,” De La Cruz said.

Prominent DC Chef Closing his Restaurants in Protest of “A Day Without Immigrants Strike.”

Chef José Andrés has announced that Zaytinya, Oyamel, and all three locations of Jaleo will be closed on Thursday because of the “A Day Without Immigrants Strike.” Andrés,  pulled out of his planned restaurant at Donald Trump’s D.C. hotel because of the president’s comments about restaurants in the DC area.

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The strike is in response to the nationwide ICE raids ordered by Trump who signed an executive order granting himself the right to more aggressively deport immigrants. There’s also the matter of the wall Trump plans to build on the Mexican border.

Restaurants that decide to stay open will look and feel a little different on Thursday because not only will there likely be a shortage of workers, but the supply chain will also be impacted. Bub & Pops co-owner Arlene Wagner, for example, says one of her purveyors warned her that there would be a disruption in bread delivery.

This is a list of other restaurants in the DC area, that will be completely closed Thursday:

Himitsu, Thip Khao, Toli Moli, Hank’s Oyster Bar (all locations), Hank’s Pasta Bar, Hank’s Cocktail Bar, Bad Saint, Blue 44, Sweetgreen, DC Empanadas, Toki Underground, Surfside, Bub & Pop’s, Pupatella, Rappahannock Oyster Bar, Busboys & Poets (all locations)., Brookland’s Finest, Peacock Café and Pizzeria Paradiso.